The British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) is the governing body for university sports in the United Kingdom. It is responsible for organising inter-university sports within the UK and representative teams for the World University Championships and the World University Games. The body was founded in 1994, one of its co-founders being Alun Evans. Apart from a couple of Oxbridge events British university sport is not followed by the general public, so the BUSA has a much lower profile in the British sporting scene than the NCAA has in the United States, although BUSA is trying to change this.

BUSA is responsible for governing all British university sport at national and international level including the World University Games. BUSA coordinates around 1.2 million students who compete in 3200 teams and 503 leagues of all kinds of sports across Britain.

University sports clubs can affiliate to BUSA through their Athletic Union or students’ union when no separate AU exists. BUSA has the biggest sporting programme in Europe, with 503 participating leagues.

Sponsors

BUSA currently has three main sponsors. Vodafone was announced as the title sponsor of BUSA at the start of the 2006-7 academic year. Vodafone and BUSA now offer a graduate recruitment partnership whereby graduates are placed on the graduate training scheme at Vodafone The Daily Telegraph newspaper has sponsored BUSA since 1998, they publish regular reports about BUSA events in both The Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph. PriceWaterhouseCoopers has been sponsoring BUSA since 1999.

BUSA also has other sponsorship deals with Barclays and Lucozade Sports Drinks.

BUSA sports

    * Archery

    * Association Football

    * Athletics

    * Badminton

    * Basketball

    * Boxing

    * Canoe (and Kayak)

    * Clay Pigeon Shooting

    * Climbing

    * Cricket

    * Cycling

    * Diving

    * Equestrian

    * Fencing

    * Fives

    * Gaelic football.

          o See: British University Gaelic Football Championship

    * Golf

    * Gymnastics

    * Hockey

    * Judo

    * Ju Jitsu

    * Karate

    * Korfball

    * Lacrosse

    * Modern Biathlon

    * Netball

    * Orienteering

    * Pool

    * Rifle

    * Rowing

    * Rugby league

    * Rugby Union

    * Sailing

    * Snooker

    * Snowsports

    * Squash

    * Surfing

    * Swimming

    * Table Tennis

    * Taekwondo

    * Tennis

    * Ten-pin bowling

    * Trampolining

    * Triathlon

    * Ultimate

    * Volleyball

    * Water Polo

    * Windsurfing

The Western Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates over a wide area of the Midwestern and Western United States. It participates in the NCAA’s Division I as a hockey-only conference.

At the conclusion of the 2006 season, WCHA teams had won five consecutive NCAA men’s titles (as well as seven of the last ten) and all six women’s titles (the first was contested in 2001). The 2005 NCAA Frozen Four hockey tournament finals were comprised entirely of teams from the WCHA.

The WCHA was founded as the Midwest Collegiate Hockey League (MCHL) from 1951-53, then became the Western Intercollegiate Hockey League (WIHL) from 1953-58, and ultimately on to the Western Collegiate Hockey Association in 1959. The regular season conference champion is awarded the MacNaughton Cup, while the league’s tournament champion takes home the Broadmoor Trophy.

Members

The WCHA has 12 member schools in all; the men’s division operates with 10 members, while the women’s division has eight.

Institution  

Location  

Founded  

Joined  

Affiliation  

Enrollment  

Nickname  

NCAA Men’s

 

 

Championships  

NCAA Women’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Championships  

Primary Conference 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Alaska Anchorage

Anchorage, Alaska

1977

1993

Public

18,000

Seawolves

0

N/A

Great Northwest (D-II)

Bemidji State University

Bemidji, Minnesota

1919

1999

Public

4,800

Beavers

Plays in CHA

0

Northern Sun (D-II)

Colorado College

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1874

1951

Private

1,950

Tigers

2

N/A

SCAC (D-III)

University of Denver

Denver, Colorado

1864

1951

Private

9,500

Pioneers

7

N/A

Sun Belt

Michigan Technological University

Houghton, Michigan

1885

1951

 

 

 

 

 

 

(CCHA, 1981-84)

Public

6,460

Huskies

3

N/A

GLIAC (D-II)

 

 

 

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota

1851

1951

Public

51,194

Golden Gophers

5

2

Big Ten

University of Minnesota Duluth

Duluth, Minnesota

1947

1966

Public

10,500

Bulldogs

0

3

North Central (D-II)

Minnesota State University, Mankato

Mankato, Minnesota

1868

1999

Public

14,000

Mavericks

0

0

North Central (D-II)

University of North Dakota

Grand Forks, North Dakota

1883

1951

Public

13,000

Fighting Sioux

7

0

North Central (D-II)

Ohio State University

Columbus, Ohio

1870

1999

Public

51,818

Buckeyes

Plays in CCHA

0

Big Ten

St. Cloud State University

St. Cloud, Minnesota

1869

1990

Public

14,252

Huskies

0

0

North Central (D-II)

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Madison, Wisconsin

1848

1969

Public

41,169

Badgers

6

2

Big Ten

 

Former Members

Institution  

Location  

Founded  

Tenure of

 

 

 

 

 

 

Membership  

Affiliation  

Enrollment  

Nickname  

Teams  

NCAA

 

 

 

 

Championships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(men’s) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

University of Michigan

Ann Arbor, Michigan

1817

1951-1981

Public

40,025

Wolverines

Men’s

9 (5)†

 

Michigan State University

East Lansing, Michigan

1855

1951-1981

Public

45,166

Spartans

Men’s

3 (1)†

 

Northern Michigan University

Marquette, Michigan

1899

1984-1997

Public

9,000

Wildcats

Men’s

1 (1)†

 

University of Notre Dame

South Bend, Indiana

1842

1971-1981

Private

10,311

Fighting Irish

Men’s

0 (0)†

 

 

    * All former members of the WCHA are current members of the CCHA.

† Number of NCAA championships won while WCHA member.

Conference arenas

School  

Hockey Arena  

Capacity 

Alaska-Anchorage Seawolves

Sullivan Arena

6,406

Bemidji State Beavers

John S. Glas Field House

2,399

Colorado College Tigers

World Arena

7,343

Denver Pioneers

Magness Arena

6,026

Michigan Tech Huskies

John MacInnes Ice Arena

4,200

Minnesota Golden Gophers

Mariucci Arena (men)

10,000

       

Ridder Arena (women)

3,400

Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs

Duluth Entertainment Convention Center (DECC)

5,333

Minnesota State Mavericks

Alltel Center

4,832

North Dakota Fighing Sioux

Ralph Engelstad Arena

11,406

Ohio State Buckeyes

OSU Ice Arena

1,415

St. Cloud State Huskies

National Hockey Center

5,763

Wisconsin Badgers

Kohl Center

15,237

 

Sun
9
Dec
11:56 am

Hockey East Association is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. It participates in the NCAA’s Division I as a hockey-only conference.

 

Hockey East came into existence in 1984 for men’s hockey when most of its current members split apart from what is today known as ECAC Hockey. It largely sought to emulate the Big East Conference, which had grown quickly since its creation a few years earlier. The women’s league began play in 2002.

Members

There are currently 11 member schools; the men’s division of Hockey East has ten members, while the women’s division has eight.

Institution

Location

Nickname

Founded

Affiliation

Enrollment

Primary Conference

Boston College

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

Eagles

1863

Private/Catholic (Jesuit)

9,019

ACC

Boston University

Boston, Massachusetts

Terriers

1839

Private/Non-Sectarian

32,000

America East

University of Connecticut

Storrs, Connecticut

Huskies (Women)

1881

Public

27,500

Big East

University of Maine

Orono, Maine

Black Bears (men’s team article)

1865

Public

11,222

America East

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Amherst, Massachusetts

Minutemen (Men)

1863

Public

25,633

Atlantic 10

University of Massachusetts Lowell

Lowell, Massachusetts

River Hawks (Men)

1894

Public

11,208

Northeast Ten (D-II)

Merrimack College

North Andover, Massachusetts

Warriors (Men)

1947

Private/Catholic

2,174

Northeast Ten (D-II)

University of New Hampshire

Durham, New Hampshire

Wildcats

1866

Public

16,025

America East

Northeastern University

Boston, Massachusetts

Huskies

1898

Private/Non-sectarian

22,942

CAA

Providence College

Providence, Rhode Island

Friars

1917

Private/Catholic

3,648

Big East

University of Vermont

Burlington, Vermont

Catamounts

1791

Public

9,675

America

East

    * Boston College

          o 7-time Hockey East men’s champions (1987, 1990, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2005, 2007)

          o 10-time Hockey East men’s regular season champions (1985, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005)

          o 2-time ECAC men’s champions (1965, 1978)

          o 1-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1980)

          o 2-time NCAA men’s champions (1949, 2001)

    * Boston University

          o 6-time Hockey East men’s champions (1986, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2006)

          o 7-time Hockey East men’s regular season champions (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2006)

          o 5-time ECAC men’s champions (1972, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977)

          o 6-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1965, 1967, 1971, 1976, 1978, 1979)

          o 4-time NCAA men’s champions (1971, 1972, 1978, 1995)

    * University of Connecticut (women only; men compete in Atlantic Hockey)

    * University of Maine

          o 5-time Hockey East men’s champions (1989, 1992, 1993, 2000, 2004)

          o 3-time Hockey East men’s regular season champions (1988, 1993, 1995)

          o 2-time NCAA men’s champions (1993, 1999)

    * University of Massachusetts Amherst (men only)

    * University of Massachusetts Lowell (men only)

          o 3-time NCAA Division II men’s champions (1979, 1981, 1982)

    * Merrimack College (men only)

          o 1-time NCAA Division II men’s champions (1978)

    * University of New Hampshire

          o 2-time Hockey East men’s champions (2002, 2003)

          o 6-time Hockey East men’s regular season champions (1992, 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2007)

          o 2-time Hockey East women’s champions (2006, 2007)

          o 4-time Hockey East women’s regular season champions (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007)

          o 1-time ECAC men’s champions (1979)

          o 1-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1974)

          o 5-time ECAC women’s champions (1986, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1996)

          o 1-time women’s national champions (1998) *crowned by AWCHA, pre-dated NCAA Women’s Frozen Four)

    * Northeastern University

          o 1-time Hockey East men’s champions (1988)

          o 1-time ECAC men’s champions (1982)

          o 3-time ECAC women’s champions (1988, 1989, 1997)

    * Providence College

          o 2-time Hockey East men’s champions (1985, 1996)

          o 3-time Hockey East women’s champions (2003, 2004, 2005)

          o 2-time Hockey East women’s regular season champions (2003, 2005)

          o 2-time ECAC men’s champions (1964, 1981)

          o 2-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1964, 1983)

          o 5-time ECAC women’s champions (1985, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995)

    * University of Vermont

          o 1-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1996)

List of Men’s Hockey East Championship Games

The Hockey East Championship Game has been held in Boston since 1987, at the FleetCenter, now the TD Banknorth Garden, since 1996. The first two were held in Providence, Rhode Island at the Providence Civic Center (now the Dunkin’ Donuts Center).

The final game and the semifinal games are held on consecutive nights in mid-March at the Garden. The quarterfinal round takes place the previous weekend. The top eight teams in the league advance to the quarterfinal round: the quarterfinal round series are 2-out-of-3 series with all games played at the higher seed’s rink. There have been two cases where the #8 seed won on the #1 team’s ice.

    * 1985 Providence def. Boston College 2-1 (ot)

    * 1986 Boston University def. Boston College 9-4

    * 1987 Boston College def. Maine 4-2

    * 1988 Northeastern def. Maine 4-3

    * 1989 Maine def. Boston College 5-4

    * 1990 Boston College def. Maine 4-3

    * 1991 Boston University def. Maine 4-3 (ot)

    * 1992 Maine def. New Hampshire 4-1

    * 1993 Maine def. Boston University 5-2

    * 1994 Boston University def. UMass Lowell 3-2

    * 1995 Boston University def. Providence 3-2

    * 1996 Providence def. Maine 3-2

    * 1997 Boston University def. New Hampshire 4-2

    * 1998 Boston College def. Maine 3-2

    * 1999 Boston College def. New Hampshire 5-4 (ot)

    * 2000 Maine def. Boston College 2-1

    * 2001 Boston College def. Providence 5-3

    * 2002 New Hampshire def. Maine 3-1

    * 2003 New Hampshire def. Boston University 1-0 (ot)

    * 2004 Maine def. Massachusetts 2-1 (ot)

    * 2005 Boston College def. New Hampshire 3-1

    * 2006 Boston University def. Boston College 2-1 (ot)

    * 2007 Boston College def. New Hampshire 5-2

List of Women’s Hockey East Championship Games

The Hockey East Championship has been held in Boston since its inception in 2003 until 2007. The event was held at Northeastern’s Matthews Arena in 2003 and 2004 before moving to BU’s Walter Brown Arena in 2005. The tournament then returned to Matthews Arena in 2006 and will be held at UNH’s Whittemore Center in 2007.

    * 2003 Providence def. New Hampshire 1-0

    * 2004 Providence def. New Hampshire 3-0

    * 2005 Providence def. Connecticut 3-1

    * 2006 New Hampshire def. Boston College 6-0

    * 2007 New Hampshire def. Providence College 3-1

Conference arenas

School

Hockey Arena

Capacity

Boston College

Kelley Rink

7,884

Boston University (men’s team)

Agganis Arena

6,224

Boston University (women’s team)

Walter Brown Arena

3,806

Connecticut

Mark Edward Freitas Ice Forum

2,000

Maine

Alfond Arena

5,641

Massachusetts

Mullins Center

8,329

Merrimack

J. Thom Lawler Arena

2,982

New Hampshire

Whittemore Center

6,501

Northeastern

Matthews Arena

5,900

Providence

Schneider Arena

3,030

UMass Lowell

Tsongas Arena

6,496

Vermont

Gutterson Fieldhouse

4,035

 

Hockey East (Men’s) Awards

    * The Lamoriello Trophy named after Lou Lamoriello- Awarded to the Conference Champion

    * CCM / Bob Kullen Coach of the Year

    * CCM Player of the Year

    * Superskills Hockey Rookie of the Year

    * Len Ceglarski Award - Awarded to an individual student for displaying good sportsmanship.

    * Charles E. Holt Sportsmanship Award - Awarded to the team with the lowest average of penalty minutes per game in Hockey East play.

    * Old Time Hockey Best Defensive Defenseman

    * Best Defensive Forward

    * Itech Three Stars Award

Sun
9
Dec
11:55 am

ECAC Hockey is one of the six conferences that compete in NCAA Division I ice hockey. Despite its name, it is not sponsored by the Eastern College Athletic Conference, a consortium of over 300 colleges in the eastern United States. The name derives from the league’s former direct association with the ECAC, which ended in 2004.

Membership

    * Brown University

          o 3-time ECAC women’s champions (1998, 2000, 2002)

    * Clarkson University

          o 5-time ECAC men’s champions (1966, 1991, 1993, 1999, 2007)

          o 9-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1966, 1977, 1981-82, 1991, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001)

    * Colgate University

          o 1-time ECAC men’s champions (1990)

          o 3-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1990, 2004, 2006)

    * Cornell University

          o 11-time ECAC men’s champions (1967-70, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1996-97, 2003, 2005)

          o 8-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1968-70, 1972-73, 2002-03, 2005)

          o 2-time NCAA men’s champions (1967, 1970)

    * Dartmouth College

          o 1-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (2006)

          o 3-time ECAC women’s champions (2001, 2003, 2007)

    * Harvard University

          o 8-time ECAC men’s champions (1963, 1971, 1983, 1987, 1994, 2002, 2004, 2006)

          o 4-time ECAC women’s champions (1999, 2004-06)

          o 10-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1963, 1973, 1975, 1986-89, 1992-94)

          o 1-time NCAA men’s champions (1989)

          o 1-time women’s national champions (1999, crowned by AWCHA, pre-dated NCAA Women’s Frozen Four)

    * Princeton University

          o 1-time ECAC men’s champions (1998)

    * Quinnipiac University

          o New member in 2005

    * Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

          o 3-time ECAC men’s champions (1984-85, 1995)

          o 2-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1984-85)

          o 2-time NCAA men’s champions (1954, 1985)

          o Women’s team joined in 2006

    * St. Lawrence University (Team article)

          o 6-time ECAC men’s champions (1962, 1988-89, 1992, 2000-01)

          o 2-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (2000, 2007)

          o 2-time ECAC women’s regular season champions (2005-06)

    * Union College

    * Yale University

          o 1-time ECAC men’s regular season champions (1998)

As of the 2006-07 season, all ECAC schools participate with men’s and women’s teams, making ECAC Hockey the only Division I hockey conference with a full complement of teams for both sexes.

Six of the members of ECAC Hockey are also members of the Ivy League, and all of the Ivy universities with Division I ice hockey programs are also members of ECAC Hockey. Neither the University of Pennsylvania nor Columbia University have intercollegiate ice hockey programs. UPenn supported an intercollegiate varsity hockey program in the past and was an ECAC Hockey member from 1966 to 1978 before the team was disbanded. The Ivy school that has the best regular season record against other Ivy opponents is crowned the Ivy League ice hockey champion. Dartmouth and Yale shared the 2007 Ivy League ice hockey championship. The Ivy League schools require their teams to play seasons that are about three weeks shorter than those of the other schools in the league. Thus, they enter the league schedule with fewer non-conference warm-up games, though Harvard competes in the annual Beanpot Tournament and Cornell hosts a holiday tournament in Estero, Florida.

Institution

Location

Nickname

Founded

Affiliation

Enrollment

Primary Conference

Brown University

Providence, Rhode Island

Bears

1764

Private/Non-sectarian

7,744

Ivy League

Clarkson University

Potsdam, New York

Golden Knights

1896

Private/Non-sectarian

3,100

Liberty League (D-III)

Colgate University

Hamilton, New York

Raiders

1819

Private/Non-sectarian

2,800

Patriot League

Cornell University

Ithaca, New York

Big Red

1865

Private/Non-sectarian

20,400

Ivy League

Dartmouth College

Hanover, New Hampshire

Big Green

1769

Private/Congregationalist

5,753

Ivy League

Harvard University

Cambridge, Massachusetts

Crimson

1636

Private/Unitarian

20,042

Ivy League

Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey

Tigers

1746

Private/Non-sectarian

6,677 

Ivy League

Quinnipiac University

Hamden, Connecticut

Bobcats

1929

Private/Non-sectarian

7,400

NEC

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Troy, New York

Engineers

1824

Private/Non-sectarian

6,376

Liberty League (D-III)

St. Lawrence University

Canton, New York

Saints

1856

Private/Non-sectarian

2,100

Liberty League (D-III)

Union College

Schenectady, New York

Dutchmen

1795

Private/Non-sectarian

2,100

Liberty League (D-III)

Yale University

New Haven, Connecticut

Bulldogs

1701

Private/Congregationalist

11,483

Ivy League

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

The ECAC Hockey League was originally founded in 1962. In June 1983, concerns that the Ivy League schools were potentially leaving the conference and disagreements over schedule length versus academics caused Boston University, Boston College, Providence, Northeastern and New Hampshire to decide to leave the ECAC to form what would become Hockey East, which began play in 1984-1985 season. By that fall, Maine also departed the ECAC for the new conference. This left the ECAC with twelve teams (Army, Brown, Clarkson, Colgate, Cornell, Darmouth, Harvard, Princeton RPI, St. Lawrence, Vermont, Yale). Army would stay in the conference until the end of the 1990-1991 season, at which point they became independent (they now play in Atlantic Hockey) and were replaced by Union College. Vermont left the ECAC for Hockey East at the end of the 2004-2005 season, and were replaced in the conference by Quinnipiac.

Men’s ECAC championship games

From 1962 to 1992, the ECAC Championship Game was held in Boston, Massachusetts, at the Boston Arena from 1962 to 1966, and at Boston Garden from 1966 to 1992.

From 1993 to 2002, the ECAC Championship Game was held at the Olympic Center in Lake Placid, New York.

Since 2003, the ECAC Championship Game has been held at the Times Union Center (formerly Pepsi Arena) in Albany, New York.

Winners of the game are awarded the Whitelaw Cup and receive an automatic bid to the NCAA Men’s Division I Hockey Tournament.

    * 1962 St. Lawrence def. Clarkson 5-2

    * 1963 Harvard def. Boston College 4-3 (ot)

    * 1964 Providence def. St. Lawrence 3-1

    * 1965 Boston College def. Brown 6-2

    * 1966 Clarkson def. Cornell 6-2

    * 1967 Cornell def. Boston University 4-3

    * 1968 Cornell def. Boston College 6-3

    * 1969 Cornell def. Harvard 4-2

    * 1970 Cornell def. Clarkson 3-2

    * 1971 Harvard def. Clarkson 7-4

    * 1972 Boston University def. Cornell 4-1

    * 1973 Cornell def. Boston College 3-2

    * 1974 Boston University def. Harvard 4-2

    * 1975 Boston University def. Harvard 7-3

    * 1976 Boston University def. Brown 9-2

    * 1977 Boston University def. New Hampshire 8-6

    * 1978 Boston College def. Providence 4-2

    * 1979 New Hampshire def. Dartmouth 3-2

    * 1980 Cornell def. Dartmouth 5-1

    * 1981 Providence def. Cornell 8-4

    * 1982 Northeastern def. Harvard 5-2

    * 1983 Harvard def. Providence 4-1

    * 1984 Rensselaer def. Boston University 5-2

    * 1985 Rensselaer def. Harvard 3-1

    * 1986 Cornell def. Clarkson 3-2 (ot)

    * 1987 Harvard def. St. Lawrence 6-3

    * 1988 St. Lawrence def. Clarkson 3-0

    * 1989 St. Lawrence def. Vermont 4-1

    * 1990 Colgate def. Rensselaer 5-4

    * 1991 Clarkson def. St. Lawrence 5-4

    * 1992 St. Lawrence def. Cornell 4-2

    * 1993 Clarkson def. Brown 3-1

    * 1994 Harvard def. Rensselaer 3-0

    * 1995 Rensselaer def. Princeton 5-1

    * 1996 Cornell def. Harvard 2-1

    * 1997 Cornell def. Clarkson 2-1

    * 1998 Princeton def. Clarkson 5-4 (2ot)

    * 1999 Clarkson def. St. Lawrence 3-2

    * 2000 St. Lawrence def. Rensselaer 2-0

    * 2001 St. Lawrence def. Cornell 3-1

    * 2002 Harvard def. Cornell 4-3 (2ot)

    * 2003 Cornell def. Harvard 3-2 (ot)

    * 2004 Harvard def. Clarkson 4-2

    * 2005 Cornell def. Harvard 3-1

    * 2006 Harvard def. Cornell 6-2

    * 2007 Clarkson def. Quinnipiac 4-2

The Cleary Cup, named for former Harvard player and coach Bill Cleary, is awarded to the regular season champion (the team with the best in-conference record). At present, this team is given the top seed in the ECAC conference tournament (including the first round bye given to the top four seeded teams), but is not given any special consideration in the NCAA tournament.

Women’s ECAC championship games

    * 1985 Providence def. New Hampshire

    * 1986 New Hampshire def. Northeastern

    * 1987 New Hampshire def. Northeastern

    * 1988 Northeastern def. Providence

    * 1989 Northeastern def. Providence

    * 1990 New Hampshire def. Providence (in Durham, New Hampshire)

    * 1991 New Hampshire def. Northeastern (Durham)

    * 1992 Providence def. New Hampshire (in Providence, Rhode Island)

    * 1993 Providence def. New Hampshire (in Boston)

    * 1994 Providence def. Northeastern (Providence)

    * 1995 Providence def. New Hampshire (Providence)

    * 1996 New Hampshire def. Providence (Durham)

    * 1997 Northeastern def. New Hampshire (Boston)

    * 1998 Brown def. New Hampshire (Boston)

    * 1999 Harvard def. New Hampshire (Providence)

    * 2000 Brown def. Dartmouth (Providence)

    * 2001 Dartmouth def. Harvard (in Hanover, New Hampshire)

    * 2002 Brown def. Dartmouth (Hanover)

    * 2003 Dartmouth def. Harvard (Providence)

    * 2004 Harvard def. St. Lawrence (in Schenectady, New York)

    * 2005 Harvard def. Dartmouth (Schenectady)

    * 2006 Harvard def. Brown (in Canton, New York)

    * 2007 Dartmouth def. St. Lawrence (Hanover)

Conference arenas

School

Hockey arena

Capacity

Brown

Meehan Auditorium (1962)

3,100

Clarkson

Cheel Arena (1991)

3,000

Colgate

Starr Rink (1959)

2,600

Cornell

Lynah Rink (1957)

4,267

Dartmouth

Thompson Arena (1975)

4,500

Harvard

Bright Hockey Center (1956/1979)

2,850

Princeton

Hobey Baker Memorial Rink (1923)

2,092

Quinnipiac

TD Banknorth Sports Center (2007)

3,286

Rensselaer

Houston Field House (1949)

5,217

St. Lawrence

Appleton Arena (1951)

3,000

Union

Frank L. Messa Rink at Achilles Center (1975)

2,225

Yale

Ingalls Rink (1958)

3,486

 

NCAA Records

    * In 2000, St. Lawrence University won the longest game in NCAA tournament history. St. Lawrence defeated Boston University in quadruple overtime by a score of 4-3. Currently, this game is the third longest game in NCAA division I history.

    * On March 4, 2006, Union College played host to the longest NCAA men’s ice hockey game in NCAA history. In Game 2 of the first round of the 2006 ECACHL Tournament (best of three series) between Yale University and Union, Yale won 3-2 1:35 into the 5th overtime. Overall, the game took 141:35 to decide who would win.